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Archive for October 17th, 2007

Configure router to pass DHCP requests from local clients to a centralized DHCP server

The traditional role of routers in DHCP has been simply to act as a proxy device, forwarding information between the client and server. Since IOS level 12.0(1)T, Cisco routers also have DHCP server and client features. But the DHCP proxy function is still the most common for routers.

Because the initial DHCP request comes from a client that typically doesn’t have an IP address, it must find the server using a Layer 2 broadcast. So, if the router was not able to function as a proxy for these broadcasts, it would be necessary to put a DHCP server on every network segment.

IP Helper Configuration Example:

Router1#configure terminal 
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
Router1(config)#interface Ethernet0
Router1(config-if)#ip helper-address 172.25.1.1
Router1(config-if)#ip helper-address 172.25.10.7
Router1(config-if)#exit
Router1(config)#end
Router1#
NB: 172.25.1.1 and 172.25.10.7 is DHCP server IP Address

 

The DHCP server needs two critical pieces of information before it can allocate an IP address to the client. (more…)

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Wireless Electricity

Goodbye wires…

MIT team experimentally demonstrates wireless power transfer, potentially useful for powering laptops, cell phones without cords

Franklin Hadley, Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies
June 7, 2007

Imagine a future in which wireless power transfer is feasible: cell phones, household robots, mp3 players, laptop computers and other portable electronics capable of charging themselves without ever being plugged in, freeing us from that final, ubiquitous power wire. Some of these devices might not even need their bulky batteries to operate.

A team from MIT’s Department of Physics, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies (ISN) has experimentally demonstrated an important step toward accomplishing this vision of the future.

The team members are Andre Kurs, Aristeidis Karalis, Robert Moffatt, Prof. Peter Fisher, and Prof. John Joannopoulos (Francis Wright Davis Chair and director of ISN), led by Prof. Marin Soljacic.

Realizing their recent theoretical prediction, they were able to light a 60W light bulb from a power source seven feet (more than two meters) away; there was no physical connection between the source and the appliance. The MIT team refers to its concept as “WiTricity” (as in wireless electricity). The work will be reported in the June 7 issue of Science Express, the advance online publication of the journal Science. (more…)

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